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Modern Farmhouses: Where Contemporary and Country Living Meet

Though these homes can be found in both suburbs and cities, they come with authentic rural style

Contemporary meets rustic in the modern farmhouse, which combines elements of both for a home with clean, sleek lines and warm finishes.

The style often features pitched roofs reminiscent of barn roofs, oversize black casement windows, and a metal standing-seam roof. Modern farmhouses are often white with board-and-batten siding, or clad in wood or stone, with interiors that highlight those materials while adding industrial finishes and fixtures or ultramodern details.

Today these homes can be found in suburbs or cities; the style comes from rural areas and many modern farmhouses are restorations of old homes.

Timeless Quality

Interest in the modern farmhouse style has evolved over the last few years, says Los Angeles–based agent Sally Forster Jones of Compass. Many buyers are moving away from sparse contemporary builds toward classic country silhouettes.

“Contemporary homes were very popular for a period of time, but now it’s the modern farmhouses,” she notes. “Modern farmhouse architecture is much warmer. It's much more organic-feeling.”

Indeed, homes described as “modern farmhouse”–style sold for about 10% more than expected, according to a 2020 Zillow analysis of listing language and the sales performance of thousands of homes nationwide.

Homes in the style have a timeless quality, Ms. Forster Jones says.

“It's going to remain current and exciting for years and years to come, so it will not become passé because it does have all those warm, architectural elements. The woods are beautiful, the stones and other materials are beautiful,” she explains.

Ms. Forster Jones is representing a $28.5 million home in the Hollywood Hills that takes cues from the traditional shapes found on a farm, but is in a category all its own.

The six-bedroom, nine-bathroom residence was inspired by architect Louis Kahn’s multidomed Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, the agent says. Instead of the curved roofs used at the museum, the residence features a trio of gable roof points, evoking the shape of barns, above walls of glass that look out over the Hollywood Hills.

“It's actually three volumes that are together, with the central largest one being 30 feet high,” Ms. Forster Jones says. “As you enter the great room, you see this volume, the 30-foot-high ceilings, and it's breathtaking.”

The space was clad in light wood to emphasize the connection to the outdoors, according to Standard, a Los Angeles–based architecture and interior-design studio that completed the project in 2020.

“A subtle nod to the vernacular barn, the white-oak paneling guides the eye outward toward the view and gives the home a sense of natural, easy coziness,” according to the firm’s website. “Two oversize board-formed concrete fireplaces accent the living spaces.”

The other two sections of the home are divided into two stories, with private living spaces on the upper floors. The bedrooms are accented in white oak and feature marble, en suite bathrooms.

“This home has elements of the modern farmhouse, but it's not like any other modern farmhouse,” Ms. Forster Jones says.

 

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Source Mansion Global

Written by V.L. Hendrickson

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